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2broke
07-14-2015, 01:56 AM
This seems interesting. Ive never heard of this. Ive been doing some research and found out that i can get grade a certified here in arkansas to sell raw goat milk. I was wondering what kind of housing or structures i would need to get this certification? Any building plans of any sort?

2broke
07-16-2015, 05:48 PM
No replies? Not a good goat following i guess. Theres quiet a few here and one woman that sells awgoat milk too!

drdiederich
07-18-2015, 07:14 AM
To be grade A you get inspected. Talk to your area inspection people about your state codes. Assume everything must follow the PMO (pasteurized milk ordinance) even if it is sold direct to consumer or raw. The PMO contains all dairy handling rules (milk plants as well as farm)

2broke
07-19-2015, 01:15 AM
Who are area inspection people? I assume i cant google that but you know what happens when you assume lol

cousinit
07-19-2015, 07:09 AM
Why would you assume you can't google that. You can google anything. Call the State of AR down at Little Rock.

drdiederich
07-20-2015, 03:04 PM
Contact your local county extension agent (if Arkansas has those). They'll know who to contact.

Goathiker
07-30-2015, 01:21 AM
Yep, you'll have to find and ask the state agency that controls micro-dairies in your state. Every state's rules are different on this issue.
Here in Oregon I can sell as much milk as I can produce from the farm as long as I don't own more than 3 cows, or 9 does, or 9 ewes. No inspections or requirements at all.

dabeegmon
03-13-2017, 07:20 AM
Yep, you'll have to find and ask the state agency that controls micro-dairies in your state. Every state's rules are different on this issue.
Here in Oregon I can sell as much milk as I can produce from the farm as long as I don't own more than 3 cows, or 9 does, or 9 ewes. No inspections or requirements at all.

That sounds like a good thing - - - - except - - - - you get to milk (and clean all the milking equipment) and feed those animals - - - and then you get to make cheese (and clean all the cheese making equipment and areas) - - - - you might not have to make cheese every day but you WILL be doing the milking and feeding every day. Even if you get great prices for all of your product (doesn't usually start that way) you are spending at least 3 if not more hours a day cleaning your stuff (cheese making days) and your days off will be when the animals are dried off and you're hired someone else to feed them for your 4 days holiday. And if your real lucky you will be making maybe $0.25 for every hour you are working.

Not trying to diss the idea just micro-dairies are labors of love. Statistically most last 5 years or less - - - likely because of the amount of work and the tiny amount of return. Not saying you have to be a mega dairy just trying to be realistic re: the results from a 'micro dairy'.