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Thread: Hello from South Africa

  1. #1
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    Cool Hello from South Africa

    I am from South Africa and interested in dairy goat farming! I hope to exchange interesting information on the topic here with other members!

  2. #2
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    cool, I have always been interested in goats as well, but have absolutely no experience to share

  3. #3
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    Well, I expected the cattle people to be in the majority.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino View Post
    Well, I expected the cattle people to be in the majority.
    A safe assumption! I've always wanted dairy goats and in my long range life plans I intend to have a dairy goat farm along with my dairy cattle enterprises.
    DiederichFarm
    "You are only as good as your next success, not your last" Sir Jock Stirrup

  5. #5
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    Hi from Texas. I used to milk Saanen dairy goats. They are like the HolstieName:  daphne flymask.jpg
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Size:  91.0 KBns of dairy goats, they produce the most milk but with low butterfat. I made very good cheese. Unfortunately, my three does were killed in a forest fire. The UDSA (United States Dept. of Agriculture) gave people money for their livestock who were killed. I took the money and bought a Jersey heifer. Although goats have personalities kind of like dogs, well, so do Jerseys

  6. #6
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    You do realize that you must keep the buck FAR AWAY down wind or the doe's milk will taste rank, unlike cattle.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by drdiederich View Post
    A safe assumption! I've always wanted dairy goats and in my long range life plans I intend to have a dairy goat farm along with my dairy cattle enterprises.
    So I'm not the only one... I always thought it would be nice to be able to lift an uncooperative animal into position; it's a little difficult to do that with a full size Holstein.


    Girlfriend's sister makes cheese...good cheese. I am trying to line things up, so when I have my farm up and going she will be able to make mid sized batches (10-100 gallons) of cheese out of my cow and/or goat milk.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by cows250 View Post
    ...I always thought it would be nice to be able to lift an uncooperative animal into position; it's a little difficult to do that with a full size Holstein.
    That's one of the big reasons I milk Jerseys! When it comes to wrestling with them, the outcome is a lot better than with those 1800 lb. brutes.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by kipps View Post
    That's one of the big reasons I milk Jerseys! When it comes to wrestling with them, the outcome is a lot better than with those 1800 lb. brutes.
    I agree with the Jerseys... it is MUCH easier to deal with them or my smaller crosses.

    Cows, have you ever been to a goat farm? It is one of the funniest/awesomest things to see them run up the ramps to the milking platform. They are just so excited to get the grain they are fed in the parlor.
    DiederichFarm
    "You are only as good as your next success, not your last" Sir Jock Stirrup

  10. #10
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    Appearantly when milking goats its very rare for them to get mastitis. Is that true? Somebody who milked 600 told me he only had 1 mastitis case in 3 years.

    CanadianCowMan

  11. #11
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    I guess I never really asked, but I wouldn't doubt it. They don't have the liquid manure that dairy cattle do and it is easier to keep them clean... plus being a goat is pretty cool so they probably get some comfort advantages from knowing how awesome they are.
    DiederichFarm
    "You are only as good as your next success, not your last" Sir Jock Stirrup

  12. #12
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    You all are right. I do miss my goatlets. Also, you can let them into a sticker patch brushfield and they are quite happy.

    I've been trying to duplicate "Chevre" I call it 'Bovre'. Its not the same. Goat milk is more acidic than cow.

  13. #13
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    'Been to a a goat dairy once. It was pretty weird seeing the goats trotting into a parallel parlor with just headlocks on the platform-- no rump rails. I guess they're more sure-footed, and less likely to slip into the operator's pit. The other strange thing, was seeing how goats have only half of an udder. Seems to me, somebody could back two goats up tail-to-tail, and put one normal cow milker on both.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by kipps View Post
    'Been to a a goat dairy once. It was pretty weird seeing the goats trotting into a parallel parlor with just headlocks on the platform-- no rump rails. I guess they're more sure-footed, and less likely to slip into the operator's pit. The other strange thing, was seeing how goats have only half of an udder. Seems to me, somebody could back two goats up tail-to-tail, and put one normal cow milker on both.
    Oh man! Now that would be a sight!!
    DiederichFarm
    "You are only as good as your next success, not your last" Sir Jock Stirrup

  15. #15
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    I think thats a very good idea.

    Another thing- you have to milk the dominant doe first or all hell breaks loose.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by CanadianCowMan View Post
    Appearantly when milking goats its very rare for them to get mastitis. Is that true? Somebody who milked 600 told me he only had 1 mastitis case in 3 years.

    CanadianCowMan
    I have been told that the way their teats close after milkings is much better, they also naturally have a higher (healthy) SCC to fight infections.

    Quote Originally Posted by drdiederich View Post
    I agree with the Jerseys... it is MUCH easier to deal with them or my smaller crosses.

    Cows, have you ever been to a goat farm? It is one of the funniest/awesomest things to see them run up the ramps to the milking platform. They are just so excited to get the grain they are fed in the parlor.
    I have only watched youtube videos of goats being milked, but I think I get the general idea :P What I really want for the first few years is a dedicated lawn mowing crew, so I don't have to do it myself.

  17. #17
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    When I used to hand milk my Saanens I became spoiled by the nice large handful their teats provide. Now that I am milking a Jersey, she has only 3inch long teats in the front and 2 inchers in the back. Ridiculous! But I must admit, I do prefer cow milk, although there is nothing like Chevre cheese.

  18. #18
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    Thanks for the welcome.
    Quote Originally Posted by milk View Post
    I think thats a very good idea.

    Another thing- you have to milk the dominant doe first or all hell breaks loose.
    Yes, they have a pecking order. And you need to consider that when milking. The Queen goes first.
    They got better tread (they actually love some slopes and rocky areas) and weight less then cows. So the securing implements in the milking areas are different.

  19. #19
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    What kind of dairy goats do you all have in South Africa? Are there such a thing as dual purpose Milking Boer goats?

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by milk View Post
    What kind of dairy goats do you all have in South Africa? Are there such a thing as dual purpose Milking Boer goats?
    The registered milk breeds are:
    * Toggenburg
    * Saanen
    * Bunte Deutsche Edelziege (German breed)
    * British Alpines

    We got a society on that as well: http://www.milkgoats.co.za/milkgoat_...index.php?p=59

    To my knowledge Boergoats are for meat only, they don't give that much milk. But perhaps it's possible that we can get a new multipurpose breed on that. However I deem it difficult to reconcile the protein usage for muscle growth and milk production. Altough I think playing with the breeding to get some more desirable results for our conditions may be a good idea.

    Personally I may take the Toggenburgs and BDE's for the milk herd.
    What I am looking for right now is the equipment to implement a artisanal cheese making workshop.

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