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Thread: Lifting downed cows

  1. #1
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    Default Lifting downed cows

    What do you use for lifting/moving downed cows. I'm looking at this one right now. Anyone else use it?

    http://upsidaisycowlifter.com/




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  2. #2
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    There was a thread on this not too long ago.

    Alot of people seemed to like it but I will tell you in 35 years we've never saved a cow we had to lift. We put hobbles on them & put them on a bedded pack & either they get better or they don't.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by cousinit View Post
    There was a thread on this not too long ago.

    Alot of people seemed to like it but I will tell you in 35 years we've never saved a cow we had to lift. We put hobbles on them & put them on a bedded pack & either they get better or they don't.
    If you want to save a cow you need to lift, they usually need to be lifted twice a day for a few days in a row. Sometimes the first day is just standing them up and they fall back over. The next day is standing long enough to get the lift off and then fall over. Then it's standing long enough to take a few steps. They take work but can be saved.


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  4. #4
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    It depends on what they have. If they cannot lay normal, forget it. Also if they did the complete splits & tore a ligament or tendon, forget it. About half the time if they got caught in a freestall & paralyzed their back, forget it.

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    It looks like a pretty cool lift. I agree with Cousinit you rarely save one you have to lift.

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    I agree that a lot of the time you need to forget it .

    We have what is called a moo-mobile that a cow can walk around in. It has a full body sling to get under the cow ( which is the hard bit ) and then a frame with wheels and hand winches gets rolled over the top . Once they are in it and provided they can support themselves a bit they can move around and eat grass . Need a nice close flat paddock .

    I have had some success with it over the years like with a heifer that had a touch of calving paralysis.

    Best to put the effort into prevention in the first place really IMO .
    "Those people who say they have no time for bodily exercise will soon have to find time for illness ". Joseph Pilates

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stan View Post
    What do you use for lifting/moving downed cows. I'm looking at this one right now. Anyone else use it?

    http://upsidaisycowlifter.com/




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    I have it and love it. It's saved multiple cows here. By far the best and easiest and most humane way to do it that I've ever come across
    DiederichFarm
    "You are only as good as your next success, not your last" Sir Jock Stirrup

  8. #8
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    How much does that run? I've developed a pretty nifty way to lift and move cows without putting straps underneath or bothering with her leg that's under her using towstraps or a roundsling (preferred ). It's not very good to hold them in place for days like this deal is though.

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    "Those people who say they have no time for bodily exercise will soon have to find time for illness ". Joseph Pilates

  10. #10

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    I use a hip hugger. Agree that most time it's better to forget it but I do find sometimes it's about getting that cow into a position that she can get up and it looks better for the cow to drag her using the hip hugger than other ways, not saying it's the best.

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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baazevedo1 View Post
    How much does that run? I've developed a pretty nifty way to lift and move cows without putting straps underneath or bothering with her leg that's under her using towstraps or a roundsling (preferred ). It's not very good to hold them in place for days like this deal is though.
    It's only like $250 or something like that. It's paid for itself many times over on our farm
    DiederichFarm
    "You are only as good as your next success, not your last" Sir Jock Stirrup

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by drdiederich View Post
    It's only like $250 or something like that. It's paid for itself many times over on our farm
    Website says $450 USD...so $550 CDN...plus $100 USD shipping...kinda expensive for what you get. But would definitely pay for itself by saving one cow.

    I know you don't end up saving many downed cows but I'm just looking to make an aggravating job a bit easier. If she's down, she's gotta be moved, unless she happens to go down in a convenient spot (which never happens). I'm currently using some 6" wide straps that my dad got over 30 years ago and need an upgrade.

    I do as much as I can to prevent any sickness but obviously there's only so much I can do.


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    Quote Originally Posted by yongfarmer89 View Post
    I use a hip hugger. Agree that most time it's better to forget it but I do find sometimes it's about getting that cow into a position that she can get up and it looks better for the cow to drag her using the hip hugger than other ways, not saying it's the best.

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    FYI, dragging cows is not permitted in the USA.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stan View Post
    Website says $450 USD...so $550 CDN...plus $100 USD shipping...kinda expensive for what you get. But would definitely pay for itself by saving one cow.

    I know you don't end up saving many downed cows but I'm just looking to make an aggravating job a bit easier. If she's down, she's gotta be moved, unless she happens to go down in a convenient spot (which never happens). I'm currently using some 6" wide straps that my dad got over 30 years ago and need an upgrade.

    I do as much as I can to prevent any sickness but obviously there's only so much I can do.


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    How do you use those straps currently?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by cousinit View Post
    FYI, dragging cows is not permitted in the USA.
    Put the cow on a sled aka thick plastic sheet. Strap cow to said sheet. Drag the sheet, not the cow. It's how we get down cows out if our parlor because there is no other way here. Getting the cow on a sheet is not easy or fun

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baazevedo1 View Post
    How do you use those straps currently?
    One strap across her chest just behind the front legs, the other just in front of the back legs/udder. Getting the front strap on is the easy part, the back one is the hard part. It works but you end up filthy and it's probably not too pleasant for the cow.


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  17. #17
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    What I do you don't need to run a strap under the cow's body. I prefer a roundsling but wide towstraps work too. You need to have enough to go around the cow twice.

    Let's say you're looking at the cow from the rear. Her left and right for this example will be looking from this angle. Let's assume the cow has her right rear leg under her and she's laying in a normal position.

    You start anywhere but let's start on her left side. You go with the tow strap under her left rear leg (the pit of the left between leg and udder) . Run the strap through there and go around her back end. Run the strap continuing along the right side of her body down low towards her front right leg. Go over her front right leg over the shoulder, cross low and tight over her brisket. Then go under her left front leg. Contine with the strap to the middle of her body on the left side. Here you can either tie another tow strap or keep running the same strap if it's long enough. Run the strap now over her left rear leg and wrap around her back in like you did the first time. Should be like a seat in the back. Run it tight and low across her body to the front right leg. This time go under her front right leg (so that it sits in the pit), low and tight against her brisket and the over her front left leg, continuing to the center of her belly where you started and tying a knot, preferably a quick release so you can undo it and use later.

    The straps should be tight against the body, with one round going under and over the three legs exposed in an alternating fashion. The leg that's under the cow the straps should be low and tight against her body and will make a seat, if you will. You grab straps on the left and right side of the cow near her center and use a short chain to tie them together. This will be your lifting point. You want to make sure that the straps are not too loses, that they are in places where they will not hurt the cow. If you place them where I indicated it will not. So you should have two straps on the left side.and two straps on the right side lifted up and tied together with a short chain. You lift the cow with a skidsteer or wheel loader and are able to move the cow without pinching her, and she's able to breath. Since the straps go all the way around, it's like a seat for the cow and you're able to pick her up and move her wherever. If you do it right, it works the same time, every time. No lifting or rolling the cow under to get straps under her belly. If dealt with dozens of down cows over the years and it's the only method I use unless im in a place where the cow can't be lifted like the parlor. I hope this is helpful and is clear enough to be useful. It's made my life so much easier and it's easier on the cows.

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