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Thread: Dairy Shed being sprayed with high power sprayer with cows still in it. Opinions

  1. #1

    Default Dairy Shed being sprayed with high power sprayer with cows still in it. Opinions

    Asking in behalf. New Job in NZ, and management has cows fed through herringbone shed and high power sprayer being sprayed to clean poo out whilst cows still in there, cleaning directly at and behind rail, udders and cows are becoming soaking wet, stressed cows, etcetera. We are experienced farmers. We know about clean dry udders. Did we just enter the Twilight Zone? Unsure if milkers are on or off while spraying. Opinions please.

  2. #2
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    Seems like a terrible idea...
    DiederichFarm
    "You are only as good as your next success, not your last" Sir Jock Stirrup

  3. #3
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    Given the option between a little bit of dry manure on the outside of the units or on the deck and water being sprayed everywhere, I prefer the dry parlor. Also, IMO, spraying water on and around cows just encourages them to **** more.

    The one farm where I was in charge of the parlor, the milkers were not allowed to use the big hoses with any cows in the parlor. Any manure on the deck would get pushed forward with a small squeegee. Very little manure in the parlor....couple dozen pies after milking 1000 cows.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by babalina View Post
    Asking in behalf. New Job in NZ, and management has cows fed through herringbone shed and high power sprayer being sprayed to clean poo out whilst cows still in there, cleaning directly at and behind rail, udders and cows are becoming soaking wet, stressed cows, etcetera. We are experienced farmers. We know about clean dry udders. Did we just enter the Twilight Zone? Unsure if milkers are on or off while spraying. Opinions please.
    I also want to mention, in the previous job, my husband had the somatic cell count averaging 75,000 somatic cell count. At one point, he had it down to 47,000. At the current farm, they are lucky to have it under 250,000.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by cows250 View Post
    ... Also, IMO, spraying water on and around cows just encourages them to **** more.
    +1.

    Also, PI counts will be through the roof with these practices, I'd think.

  6. #6
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    I'm going to play devil's advocate here. As an employee, your husband must adhere to the protocols in place until he can convince ownership to change.

  7. #7
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    I agree with Cousin , doesn't sound like much fun though.
    "Those people who say they have no time for bodily exercise will soon have to find time for illness ". Joseph Pilates

  8. #8

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    Its official. The knucklehead in charge says she likes to keep ''a wet dairy shed'' cows are sprayed with high pressure sprayer in each row. however, there is a farm supervisor over this new in charge knucklehead and a farm consultant who is on farm on a regular basis, making detailed micro plans on the farm, and that is not how he does it on his farm.

  9. #9
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    Agree with the cousinit too, doesn't sound ideal.


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  10. #10
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    How much did you vet this place before taking this job?

    Our employees never fail to tell us how it's done. And we tell them that's not how it's done here, and why.

  11. #11
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    Interested to know what the definition of high pressure sprayer is in this case?

    I would envision a pressure washer capable of 100+ psi from the terminology being used? Which could drive water under the skin if too close or too high.

    Or are we talking about wash hoses in the 40-50 psi range? Like a pistol grip on the end of a garden hose?

    For reference sake, we only spray cows with iodine prespray on a regular basis, maybe a cow every shift or two might get hosed off with garden hose pressure if the fell down in the holding area, then pre spray and wiped. Definitely want things clean and dry on the udder.

    We do hose down the deck and milking units fairly regularly between rows with lower pressure nozzles. One inch wash hose only gets used at the end of the shift
    Last edited by flatlander; 04-07-2017 at 03:46 PM.

  12. #12

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    Since i am asking in behalf of my husband , I can't answer technical questions concerning size and pressure of hose.... if you take a look at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mCH2XcjV9sY these are the type of sprayers used here. These are like big fire hydrant hoses, not pistol grip, garden hoses. Husband witnessed FM, using the high pressure hose like a fire hydrant hose. I have milked in these sheds, BTW, and handled this type of hose myself relief milking. As a woman, it is very difficult to handle. I would think if you want to spray, you would NOT want to spray when the cups are on and the hind ends of the cows are facing you. If you want to save time, and don't want to spray when the herringbone line is empty, at least spray when the cows are walking out the line and spray down... and not only under the skin. If you are spraying, this water could be driven in the cows rectum and vagina, therefore causing both a douche and enema at the same causing ????

  13. #13
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    We have a large hose to wash down the barn but we also have garden hoses hanging down that we mostly use during milking. Our parlor does not have a grate where the cows defecate (hey, I didn't build it lol) so we find ourselves spraying down often. If there's enough pressure, maybe garden houses will be a better alternative to rinsing something down. At least while the cows are around, if need be.

  14. #14

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    I think I found your husbands milking shed https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=UTyHiC5Vo7w

  15. #15
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    Yep that is a no no for me


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  16. #16
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    I'm not crazy about that water spraying all over but I am jealous of the parlor, compared to our flat barn parlor.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by BoerMaak'nPlan View Post
    I think I found your husbands milking shed https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=UTyHiC5Vo7w
    And then.....the first cow takes a dump.

    Seriously though, any bacteria on the udder just got a free ride into the liner. That's a milk quality disaster IMO.

    Also, one of the narrowest pits I have seen. Looks to function well, but you better like your co-worker.

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