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Thread: Why are my cows leaving grass behind?

  1. #1

    Default Why are my cows leaving grass behind?

    My cows leave sizable patches of lush green grass behind and will mow down pasture around it to nearly dirt...why are they avoiding those spots? It feels like a waste to move their fence but they aren't eating it and I don't want them to go hungry..

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    1,295

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    Likely high nitrates. Ever notice how cows won't eat that lush green grass growing where there was a cow pie last year?

  3. #3

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    They are cows. It'll be there the next time threw.

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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
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    353

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    Quote Originally Posted by yongfarmer89 View Post
    They are cows. It'll be there the next time threw.

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    But quality will be compromised...

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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
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    353

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    Quote Originally Posted by whistle pig View Post
    Likely high nitrates. Ever notice how cows won't eat that lush green grass growing where there was a cow pie last year?
    I agree with the above. In my system it usually means my rotation is too long. I cant speak for you

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  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kiwi_Milker View Post
    But quality will be compromised...

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    Seems like my cows would rather have some older stuff mixed in, or better than nothing. Bone dry here and we've been feeding a bunch of stored feed. It seems the quality falls off after the 2nd or 3rd time threw any way.

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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
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    33

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    I did a grazing field day recently at a grass only dairy i have been helping out and they talked about cows picking and choosing certain grasses sometimes but not other times, they were saying that cows know what they need for that certain time and other farmers had delt with it as well. I think as long as there is enough to choose from so they get enough dm intake.

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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    SW ONT
    Posts
    28

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    Quote Originally Posted by whistle pig View Post
    Likely high nitrates. Ever notice how cows won't eat that lush green grass growing where there was a cow pie last year?
    When we had the cows on pasture more, we used a set of chain harrows that had been flipped upside down and had some old tires bolted on for weight. Once the cows were moved to the next section, we pulled this harrow around to spread out all the pies. After a rain or two, they were mostly gone.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    South West Victoria , Australia
    Posts
    1,487

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    I only harrow paddocks in the autumn time after dry cows have finished off a paddock . We have a couple of sets of harrows but my favourite is the heavy Errey harrows made of railway iron which can be used as a basic smudger to spread all the manure . On one side I've welded heavy duty spikes that are useful for repairing deep pugging or damaged areas from a bulk spreader or tractor . On our clay based soils you really need something like this .

    The thing is though , you need to be careful where you leave them once you've finished ! I have heard stories of guys leaving them in the corner of a paddock for the custom guy to find them with his mower !
    "Those people who say they have no time for bodily exercise will soon have to find time for illness ". Joseph Pilates

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Outram, New Zealand
    Posts
    15

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    Hi mhowardvt,
    I'm picturing a 12" diameter patch. If I saw something like that I'd assume it was a urine patch from last time the paddock was grazed. I would not be concerned and would move the fence. It's great they are doing such a good job of grazing everywhere else.

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