Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Silage pile management

  1. #1

    Default Silage pile management

    Just wondering what people are using for the face of silage piles. I am currently trying to decide between a defacer (thinking of the Emily defacer with the bucket) or a shear grab. So far I am leaning more towards a jaylor shear grab. It would be going on a 175 horsepower loader tractor. Any input either way would be appreciated

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    De Pere, WI
    Posts
    3,578

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mb farmer View Post
    Just wondering what people are using for the face of silage piles. I am currently trying to decide between a defacer (thinking of the Emily defacer with the bucket) or a shear grab. So far I am leaning more towards a jaylor shear grab. It would be going on a 175 horsepower loader tractor. Any input either way would be appreciated
    We just use the bucket. However, we are looking at getting a rake so as to extend the height we can operate at.

    Sent from my SM-G930R4 using Tapatalk
    DiederichFarm
    "You are only as good as your next success, not your last" Sir Jock Stirrup

  3. #3

    Default

    That makes a lot of sense to go with the rake to be able to extend your reach.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    NW Iowa
    Posts
    38

    Default

    You will not believe how neat and fresh your pile will stay with a facer of some type. The cows will thank you for it. I use an EZ Rake for the ease of use. Power quicktach on the wheel loader and I never leave the seat. No hoses to hook and simple, rugged construction. My first one was a 6' reach, I traded it after 5 years for a 12' and the dealer gave me a trade in value of exactly what I had paid for it originally. I used the bucket edge for years thinking that it worked well. I have since learned how much I was still disturbing the silage left on the pile. This is more evident in the heat of the summer. The EZ Rake is also not affected much by sub zero temperatures and frozen silage chunks.

    http://easyrakefacer.com/
    Last edited by cowfeeder; 11-12-2017 at 07:08 PM. Reason: To add link

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    155

  6. #6

    Default

    Grazy, how many lbs of silage do you get In your silocut? Not sure where you are at but I see snow on the ground of your picture so I'm assuming you get cold weather. How does it work when the silage is frozen and does it work well with only having tines on the bottom or would a solid floor be better?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Barron, Wisconsin
    Posts
    970

    Default

    Another vote for a rake. They don't break and don't have hydraulic hoses to attach and detach (or forget to detach.) Also, if the winter weather gets really bad you can pull the tires, plastic, snow and ice off the top of the pile without chipping through >1' of icy snow for hours. Still a mess to sort through on the ground, but much more manageable and the ice is in smaller pieces.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    155

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mb farmer View Post
    Grazy, how many lbs of silage do you get In your silocut? Not sure where you are at but I see snow on the ground of your picture so I'm assuming you get cold weather. How does it work when the silage is frozen and does it work well with only having tines on the bottom or would a solid floor be better?
    I've got the 230, holds about 1500 lbs on grass silage and 2000 lbs corn silage with a full block. I'm in central Wisconsin, frozen feed is no problem had a bag of corn silage in the winter of 2013 that was totally frozen and didn't give any problems but I'm glad I have everything in bunkers now. Tines works best in silage, if you're feeding a lot of loose products a solid floor would be more convenient. There are also insert buckets available when you have tines.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    50

    Default

    We love our silage rake! It does a really good job. Plus no hoses to hook up, and no bearing to go out on a Sunday morning when it's 10 degrees outside.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    216

    Default

    How do silage rakes work in haylage?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Barron, Wisconsin
    Posts
    970

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wisjag View Post
    How do silage rakes work in haylage?
    They work fine. Haylage will be slower to knock down than corn silage, but that is true with or without a facer. A rake will also maintain fiber length, but a hydraulic rotating facer will reduce particle length, especially in haylage. This may be a good or bad thing depending on your farm. Rakes also leave a more "ragged" feed face than a hydraulic rotating facer would, depending on how fast you feed through silage this may or may not be a concern. (If you needed to take only 3"-6" off a face daily a rake may lead to more spoilage....1' or more per day just use a rake and get done much faster.)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Central Valley California
    Posts
    426

    Default

    How long does it take to rake a days worth of silage? Do you rake silage just once a day?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    NW Iowa
    Posts
    38

    Default

    I maybe spend 10 minutes a day raking the feed that I need for a 500 cow herd. Quick attach buckets and facer make it very efficient. Can rake the face faster with the rake than I used to with the bucket edge. I usually just rake down the amount that is needed for that feeding. The idea is to not disturb any silage not being used at that time. Why cut down on bunk life anymore then necessary.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    50

    Default

    Haylage is harder to face than corn silage, that is true with a facer or a rake. It just takes a bit longer, Maybe 1-2 min.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    216

    Default

    We use a rotary style facer . It is a direct drive hydraulic auger with bolt on teeth. Has been good to us just replace the teeth more than I would like too. I am always looking for a way to save time but I am afraid with the rake I would have to run my mixer longer because of the haylage having more lumps in it than with our rotary facer. I also donít know if I could handle having the rough face compared to our smooth face currently.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •